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the pundits are saying in washington but what people back home are thinking about the future and what this election means. so jim, you're going to get the last word. >> thank you. in terms of consensus, i do agree with, i guess stan also the immigration is something there will be some forward progress on. i also agree with stan on the health insurance issue is probably some of plato. i was struck when the shootings happened in aurora, colorado, over the summer, that is exactly the demographic of people who don't have health insurance, young working-class kind of people. and the hospitals all said of course we will pay for all their bills and stuff. we will find the money from somewhere through some mechanism, come may. we always have. entrance a prediction, again i'm a little bit and -- i met with the doctor this money at an age. there's a congressman named rob andrews is a democrat of new jersey, 11 terms, a fairly secret guy, democratic conference, who had an article in "the wall street journal" inception in what she calls for an effort on medicine. he said specifically we should be
. >> caller: thank you. the people are so tired of the fighting in washington. like the one candidate said, if they don't do their job they do not get paid. we, the people come have got to start taking these matters into hands because we are sick of it. and, you know, what i would like to tell john boehner is don't give in to this craziness. this is nothing but craziness. and i watched harry reid yesterday. you know, he talked and he talked and he really said nothing. then he went on about dance, dance, dance and i thought to myself all you do is dance around with these bills that they send. the house will have a bill, they send it to the senate and what does he do? dances around it and never addresses it. >> host: know by partisanship than for you? >> caller: no, absolutely none. then when he left the stage and was walking off, the man -- i feel bad for him that he just can't get it together -- he grabbed ahold of the flag. he was falling. then he grabbed ahold of low wall and at that point i said uh oh that man needs to go home. he's too old to be there. he doesn't do his job and is coll
in bellingham, washington, good afternoon. please go ahead with your question or comment for steven johnson. >> caller: hi, pleasure speaking to you. 8, i was a first wave environmental planner back in the mid '70s, so i'dhead of your ghost -- i'd heard of your ghost maps story. and in -- after i graduated i thought i'd kick around the idea of architecture plus ecology and play with computer models and satellite data late at night without authorization. [laughter] before the term hacker or geospatial intelligence technology was invented. anyway, i became a mr. mom in '82 because that was really going nowhere. today, however, it looks like, you know, cloud technology and c factor computing and a lot of these breakthroughs are going to make three dimensional environmental computing feasible. the problem i saw then was a global vision in a flat world, you know? we didn't really have a three dimensional philosophy. to work with this new technology. and i don't even see it there now. and it's kind of a little troubling, you know? any comments, thoughts? thanks. >> guest: yeah, great. what an int
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